By April 15, 2014 0 Comments Read More →

Easter Menu

vintage easter card

Some member’s of Richard’s family are coming for Easter dinner. I’ve had a really fun time today creating an Easter Menu. For my own enjoyment, I sometimes make up a printed menu. Here’s what I’ve come up with. . . 2014 Easter Menu 3 Originally, I had planned on having an Easter barbeque, with chicken, beans and coleslaw. Now that might seem out of season to some folks, but remember this is southern Arizona, where the temperatures are currently in the mid 80’s. However, Richard did not think that barbeque chicken was special enough for an  Easter dinner. After a bit of rethinking, I decided to bake a ham. That led me on an internet hunt for an exciting ham recipe. I’m pleased to say, I think I found a good one! It’s Emeril Lagasse’s recipe for Cola-Baked Ham with Cherry Orange Glaze. It has fabulous, 5-star reviews on the Food Network site. I’m looking forward to giving it a try!

Courtesy of Food Network

Emeril’s Cola Glazed Ham, Courtesy of Food Network

While I was surfing the internet for a ham recipe, I ran across some interesting information that I want to pass on to readers who might also be baking a ham for Easter.

Elise Bauer, creator of Simply Recipes, offers advice on how to prevent a dry ham. In her Glazed Baked Ham Recipe, she removes her ham from the refrigerator 1 to 2 hours before baking. This allows the ham to come to room temperature, thus reducing the baking time. I think that this is an excellent suggestion. I definitely will be trying this. Elise also states that “ready-to-eat” hams are already cooked. They do not need to be baked to 140 degrees, they only need to be warmed to between 110 to 120 degrees. This is news to me! Personally, I’m not sure that I would like a ham baked only to 110 degrees. It might be safe, but I fear that it would not be hot enough to suit me. On the other hand, I have made dry ham by cooking it to 140 degrees. I’m going to try baking mine cola basted ham to between 130 and 135 degrees. If you are baking a spiral sliced ham, America’s Test Kitchen has good suggestions on how to keep a spiral sliced ham moist. See their Glazed Spiral-Sliced Ham recipe. I never can decide on whether to buy a ham shank or ham butt. From what I understand, there is more meat on the butt, but it is harder to carve. Any opinions on this? Does the meat taste better on one or the other? There are detailed photos picturing how to carve both a shank ham and a butt ham (as well as a whole ham and a spiral ham) on RecipeTips.com. This post will be a big help to me, since I normally just get out my electric knife and have at it. Getting back to my Easter menu, after I found my ham recipe things just fell into place. I have an abundance of eggs at the moment, so deviled eggs will be a perfect appetizer. I was going to go a bit wild and make wasabi deviled eggs, but I decided  that Food.com’s popular, Miss Daisy’s Deviled Eggs , recipe would be better suited to Richard’s family, especially for the young children. It’s a traditional version of deviled eggs made with mayonnaise, spices and sweet pickle relish.

photo by Lvs2cook at Food.com

photo by Lvs2cook at Food.com

In my mind, if you have ham you must have cheese. I’m making a copycat recipe for Cracker Barrel’s Hashbrown Casserole. It’s loaded with potatoes, butter, onion, sour cream and cheddar cheese. This recipe is posted all over the internet, but I’m making Mark Hester’s version from CreativeHomemaking.com, because it has a crispy corn flake topping.

photo from creativehomemaking.com

photo from creativehomemaking.com

I decided to make some simple, basic green beans and carrots. But, once again, Richard had to put in his two cents. He thought I needed to, somehow, make the beans and carrots a little bit special, since they are for a holiday meal. After a little searching online, I found a recipe for Green Beans with Almonds at CherishedBliss.com and a recipe for Rosemary & Honey Glazed Carrots from KathyP100 at Allrecipes.com. The green beans are mixed with onion and garlic, tossed with olive oil and balsamic vinegar, then topped with toasted almonds. The carrots are cooked with butter, honey and fresh rosemary. For added flavor, I plan on roasting both the beans and carrots in foil packets on the grill.

photo from Cherished Bliss

photo from Cherished Bliss

photo from Cooking Up a Storm at Allrecipes.com

photo from Cooking Up a Storm at Allrecipes.com

I’m putting in a little plug for Sister Schubert’s Dinner Yeast Rolls. They are great! Whenever I serve these rolls, I get asked about them. I’m tempted to say it’s a secret recipe, but I do confess that they are Sister Schubert’s rolls. You will find them in the freezer section of the supermarket. Sister Schubert's Rolls I’m also making a coconut cream poke cake for dessert. I could not find a recipe for exactly the way I want to make my cake, so you will have to imagine it. I’m making a yellow sheet cake with shredded coconut and coconut flavoring added. Using the handle of a wooden spoon, I’ll poke holes into the baked cake, then pour vanilla pudding over the cake and into the holes. Lastly, I’ll top the cake with sweetened whip cream and sprinkled it with toasted coconut. Doesn’t that sound good? Sort of a combination of coconut cake and a coconut cream pie. Well, it’s getting late here, so I’ll wish you a Happy Easter and retire. Oh, I’ll take some pictures of my dishes and let you know how they turn out.

vintage Easter postcard

 Happy Easter, from Lisa!

Posted in: Holidays, Menus, RECIPES

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